Steamed Fish + Pak Choi in Parchment Paper

 
This is the third summer recipe in partnership with  Grey Arrow Farm’s CSA program .

This is the third summer recipe in partnership with Grey Arrow Farm’s CSA program.

Dinner that comes together in minutes! Heck yes. Perfect for those busy weekday meals, but without sacrificing any flavour or wholesome vegetable goodness.

Cooking in parchment paper, or en papillote, is such a wonderful way to lock in flavour and moisture when cooking fish. Most white fish will work with this recipe and the bold flavours of chili, lime, soy and ginger.

Steamed fish, with ginger, soy, green onions and pak choi in parchment paper

Recipe is for one individual package. Multiple quantities depending on how many filets you are cooking.

  • 6 oz filet of cod or white fish

  • 4-6 stems of pak choi (baby bok choy)

  • 1 spring of green onions, cut into 3-4 inch strips

Dressing

  • ¼ tsp lime zest

  • 1 tsp lime juice

  • 1 tsp of fresh ginger, grated

  • 3 tsp soy sauce

  • ½ tsp sesame seed oil

  • 2 tsp olive oil

  • ½ tsp red chilli flakes or sliced birds eye chillies (optional)

  • Salt and pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Mix lime zest and juice, ginger, soy sauce, sesame seed oil, olive oil and red pepper flask in a small bowl. Whisk with a fork to combine.

Cut an 18-inch piece of parchment and fold in half lengthwise.

Place the pak choi and fillet along each folded crease. Season the fillet with salt and pepper. Dress both the fillet and pak choi with the dressing and springs of green onion.

Fold parchment over fish and crimp the sides of paper over itself like you are making a dumpling or perogy. Make sure the folds are tight to keep in the steam as it cooks.

Place on a baking sheet and bake for 10 to 12 minutes. Cut the packets just before serving; be careful of any escaping steam.

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Citrus Poached Shrimp with Lemon Dill Horseradish Dipping Sauce

 
Poachedshrimp

Some of the equipment photographed in this post were provided by Paderno. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

I find this recipe super versatile. It’s a quick, no-fuss entertaining option. I’ve also whipped up a batch for a quick picnic lunch too. I like to leave their shells on. They get much more flavourful in the poaching liquid, and are super fun and hands on to dig into.

Citrus Poached Shrimp with Lemon Dill Horseradish Dipping Sauce

  • 2 pounds of shrimp (I like leaving shells on)

  • 1 oranges, sliced

  • 2 limes, sliced

  • 1 lemon, sliced

  • 1 tbs of salt

  • ½ tbs black peppercorns

  • ½ tbs white peppercorns

  • ½ tbs coriander seeds

  • 3 bay leaves

  • 4 litres of water

Bring water to a boil and add the citrus slices, salt, peppercorns and bay leaves. Let simmer for 10-15 minutes so the aromatics can infuse the water.

Prepare ice bath.

Add the shrimp to the aromatic water. Remove from heat and let stand for 3 minutes or until the shrimp are bright pink.

Using a spoon, remove the shrimp from the poaching liquid and place in the ice bath. Let cool, then drain. Serve with your favourite cocktail sauce or lemon dill horseradish dipping sauce.

Lemon Dill Horseradish Dipping Sauce

  • ½ cup mayonnaise

  • ½ sour cream

  • 2 tsp dried dill or 1 tbs fresh chopped dill

  • 1 tbs horseradish

  • 1 tbs lemon juice

  • 1 tsp garlic salt

 Mix all ingredients in a bowl. Let refrigerate for at least 30 minutes prior to serving.

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Cookbook Review & Salmon Gravlax from The Wickaninnish Cookbook: Rustic Elegance on Nature’s Edge

 
I was invited by  Penguin Random House Canada  to review the recently released  The Wickaninnish Cookbook: Rustic Elegance on Nature’s Edge.  So they sent me a free review copy—but even better, they want to send one to you as well! I’ll be running an Instagram contest where one of my lucky followers could win a copy of this beautiful book. Be sure to check out my  Mushroomsandthyme  feed for details on how to enter. (Note: open only to entries with a Canadian mailing address. Contest closes July 1, 2018).

I was invited by Penguin Random House Canada to review the recently released The Wickaninnish Cookbook: Rustic Elegance on Nature’s Edge. So they sent me a free review copy—but even better, they want to send one to you as well! I’ll be running an Instagram contest where one of my lucky followers could win a copy of this beautiful book. Be sure to check out my Mushroomsandthyme feed for details on how to enter. (Note: open only to entries with a Canadian mailing address. Contest closes July 1, 2018).

The moment you lay eyes on The Wickaninnish Cookbook: Rustic Elegance on Nature’s Edge you are instantly transported to the ocean and the welcoming embrace it imparts on your soul. It’s the first cookbook that made me stop dead in my tracks from rushing to open the book and flip through the recipes and photos in a mad frenzy. The texture of the front cover draws me in instantly. I’m running my hands over the front, my mind even more curious as to what I’ll find inside.  

From reading the charming introduction and history of the Wickaninnish Inn you understand the connection of the cover. The wood grain that graces the cover is embossed to replicate the texture of the hand-adzed cedar posts and beams of the Inn, hand carved by master carver Henry Nolla using traditional First nations tools.

The recipes are compiled from many of the chefs who have led The Point restaurant since 1996. From Chef Justin Labossiere’s Dungeness crab and mascarpone ravioli in saffron pasta, to Chef Matt Wilson’s Tuff Session Sourdough Bread and Chef Rod Butters’ shellfish potlatch. All recipes that you can now make in your home kitchen!

It’s this attention to detail and thoughtfulness to weave the history of the restaurant, the Inn, and the tiny surf town of Tofino, B.C. on the west coast of Vancouver Island, throughout the book that makes it so remarkable. The beautiful photography of Makito Inomata that flows alongside the recipes takes the book to a whole other level.

The cookbook also includes several cocktails that I’m dying to try as well—‘cedar-infused rye whisky’, ‘foraging through the woods’,  ‘huckleberry liqueur’ spark instantly intrigued me. Not to mention, the last chapter of the cookbook, the Pantry, is a hidden gem. The Pantry details the vinegars, oils and preserves that are needed in some of the recipes. Leek oil, dill oil, strawberry jam, apple butter and cured egg yolks to name a few. For those that love to experiment in the kitchen, these pantry items are sure to inspire beyond the recipe they are called for. 

Admittedly, I have yet to visit Tofino. It’s been on my wish list of places to see within Canada. After reading this cookbook, it’s definitely jumped up several spots on that list!

Recipes that have left me inspired to recreate, include:

  • Sunflower seed cheese

  • Mini beef tartare burgers

  • Mushroom tortellini

  • Root vegetable torte

  • BBQ beach oysters

At the top of the ‘I MUST TRY THIS!’ list was the salmon gravlax recipe, which is detailed below. I’ve never made gravlax before, but have been curious about it for a long time. You’ll find me eating smoked salmon almost every Saturday breakfast, served over grilled sourdough, an over easy egg and all the fixings—a little treat to kick start the weekend. For some reason I had it in my mind that gravlax would be difficult to tackle or turn out successfully. I always talked myself out of making it. However, it was surprising easy, and with a little planning ahead of time, really easy to make for a brunch gathering. Completely in love it the results.

Salmon Gravlax

Wickaninnish Salmon Gravlax

Picture British Columbia’s west coast and thoughts of salmon won’t be far behind. Executive Chef Barr’s recipe for a simple but flavourful gravlax makes the most of the bountiful and sustainable wild fish. Perfect for canapés or as part of a seafood charcuterie platter, this is one party dish you will make again and again.

  • 1 cup (145 g) salt

  • 1 cup (200 g) sugar

  • Finely grated zest of 1 orange

  • Finely grated zest of ½ grapefruit

  • Finely grated zest of 1 lemon

  • Finely grated zest of 1 lime

  • 1 Tbsp (5 g) toasted fennel seeds, crushed

  • 2 sprigs dill, leaves only, chopped

  • 1 side fresh coho or sockeye salmon

In a small non-reactive bowl, combine all the ingredients, except the salmon, and mix well. This is the cure.

Remove the pin bones from the salmon. Rub the cure onto both sides of the salmon, making sure the flesh is completely covered. (You may not use all of the cure mixture.) Wrap the salmon tightly in plastic wrap and store on a tray in the fridge for 6 to 8 hours.

Rinse off the cure, then put the salmon back on the tray and leave it uncovered in the fridge to air-dry overnight.

Slice the salmon thinly, being sure to leave the skin behind. Serve with crackers, bread, cream cheese, capers, red onions, and pickles.

Excerpted from The Wickaninnish Cookbook: Rustic Elegance on Nature’s Edge by Joanne Sasvari. Copyright © 2018 Wickaninnish Inn. Photography © Makito Inomata. Published by Appetite by Random House®, a division of Penguin Random House Canada Limited. Reproduced by arrangement with the Publisher. All rights reserved.

Salmon Gravlax
Salmon Gravlax
Salmon Gravlax
Salmon Gravlax
Salmon Gravlax